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Under Turquoise Skies - Robinson, Will H.
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Robinson, Will H.:
Under Turquoise Skies - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 1406774146, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406774146

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 552 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=31mm, Gew.=694gr, [GR: 23690 - TB/Reiseberichte/Welt gesamt, Pole], [SW: - Travel - General], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce orflivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or eliminated. Savages were overcome... UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce orflivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or eliminated. Savages were overcome...

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Under Turquoise Skies - Robinson, Will H.
Livre non disponible
(*)
Robinson, Will H.:
Under Turquoise Skies - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 1406774146, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen

ID: 9781406774146

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 552 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=31mm, Gew.=694gr, [GR: 23690 - TB/Reiseberichte/Welt gesamt, Pole], [SW: - Travel - General], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce orflivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or eliminated. Savages were overcome...

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Under Turquoise Skies - Will H. Robinson
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Under Turquoise Skies - nouveau livre

ISBN: 1406774146

ID: 4171882127

[EAN: 9781406774146], Neubuch, [PU: Style Press], UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce or flivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or eliminated. Savages were overcome. Brand NEW unread book. This item

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Under Turquoise Skies - Will H Robinson
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Will H Robinson:
Under Turquoise Skies - Livres de poche

ISBN: 1406774146

ID: 1170673832

[EAN: 9781406774146], Neubuch, [PU: Style Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., Under Turquoise Skies, Will H Robinson, UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce orflivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or

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Under Turquoise Skies

UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES Photograph by Gen. H. F. Robinson Beating the Ceremonial Drum in the Kiva, Hopiland, i 1 1 UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES I P Outstanding Features of the Story of America s I Southwest from the Days of the Ancient Cliff-Divellers to Modern Times I BY WILL H. ROBINSON Author of The Story of Arizona, The Man from Yesterday, The Golden Palace of Neverland, Yarns of the Southwest etc. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK MCMXXVIII All rights reserved i TO GRACE PERLEY ROBINSON FELLOW-TRAVELER UNDER TURQUOISE SKIES FOREWORD HE best thing about that patriotic slogan, so deservedly dear to the hearts of railway passenger agents and automobile salesmen, See America First, is that nowadays many of us are really doing it. It was more than an educational achievement when we learned that scenery can be something else than a coupon on die end of a Swiss Inn menu and it makes for a swelling of the national chest to suspect that there are spots In the United States that have as intriguing historical associations as may be found in Italy or Egypt. Now there is that fascinating section of America known as the Southwest You see I got to it rather quickly Its like the book agent who plants his foot in the crack of the heskant door he will have his way. Only here there is this important difference, in the book-agent sense the Southwest has nothing to sell but good will. He is the host and he comes right out into the front yard and asks the world to drop in and share his hospitality. And, as there are other attractive yards in our country something we are very glad to admit perhaps it would be as well to give you the exact address of our Southwest so that when, as in your train or your Rolls-Royce orflivver, you make the rounds, you will not miss the turn when you reach the Enchanted Land. In a general way it may be said that the Southwest is New H5B5E5E5H55H55E5E5E5E FOREWORD Mexico and Arizona with a narrow strip added on the north and east. The boundary to the north should be pushed up far enough to include the San Juan River country with its wonderful cliff dwellings the east line cuts through the Llano Estacado. Westward the district of our story might properly take in the California desert up to the Coast Range, but for the sake of unity we shall set up an arbitrary border at the Colorado River. We, who have spent much of our lives in the Enchanted Land, wonder if in all the world there is another spot that has a greater scenic and historical lure. The Grand Canyon, the Painted Desert, the Fallen Petrified Forests, the Pre historic Cliff Dwellings, the Great Pyramidal Community Houses of the Pueblo Indians, the Inscription Rock of the Conquistadores, the Spanish Missions titles for a thousand stories words to conjure with Every country has its personality and, to a certain degree, impresses that personality upon its inhabitants just as, in turn, the people help make up the atmosphere of the country. The Southwest was not a land of ease for its pioneers. Crossing its deserts in summer they faced a very inferno of heat in cutting their way through high mountain passes in winter they encountered a cold but little short of arctic. They experienced droughts they were lured to fearful suffer ings by mirages they were tormented by sandstorms. They found it a land of poisonous insects, venomous snakes and savage Indians. In most sections there was not rain enough to produce a crop, and what plants there were growing wild, that might have yielded them food, were either unknown or hidden from view. Each man was thus tested, and in the testing the weak FOREWORD the counterfeit succumbed die strong overcame. Trails were found or made through seemingly impossible country. Plants as forbidding as the bristling cacti were found to bear edible fruit. They discovered one variety of cactus that carried water enough to sustain life. Poisonous insects and reptiles were easily ignored or eliminated. Savages were overcome...

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Under Turquoise Skies


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406774146
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406774146
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 2007
Editeur: DODO PR
552 Pages
Poids: 0,694 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 10.02.2009 17:24:27
Livre trouvé récemment le 05.12.2011 17:42:11
ISBN/EAN: 9781406774146

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
1-4067-7414-6, 978-1-4067-7414-6


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