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Home Birth: An Invitation and a Guide - Gilgoff, Alice
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Gilgoff, Alice:
Home Birth: An Invitation and a Guide - Livres de poche

1988, ISBN: 0897891783, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9780897891783

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: J F BERGIN & GARVEY, 192 Seiten, L=153mm, B=228mm, H=10mm, Gew.=249gr, [GR: 24620 - TB/Ratgeber Gesundheit], [SW: - Family / Parenting / Childbirth], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: Couples contemplating childbirth at home will find both basic information and unbounded encouragement in this quite personal report. Gilgoff covers most contingencies, from medical issues and legal considerations to hot water and ice chips, and even suggests ways of answering tactless inquiries. Like Suzanne Arms in Immaculate Deception (1975), she repudiates the medical approach to childbirth, the "hospital mentality" which serves doctors instead of patients, keeps mothers passive and newborns out of reach, and she champions the role of the midwife or other experienced birth attendant (with emergency backup available). And, like most recent observers of pregnancy and childbirth, she criticizes American obstetrical practice: high cesarean rates and routine episiotomies, the required lithotomy position and little personalized care, the widespread use of drugs and fetal monitors, and, until recently, the preoccupation with weight gain rather than nutritional values. Consumer pressure, she avows, has already influenced hospital policies, but no hospital has the built-in advantages of home, glowingly described here. Her tone, however, will dismay some readers: as in Immaculate Deception, midwives are invariably "selfless" and informed while doctors and nurses are uppity and ignorant. Also, some claims are outsized and unsubstantiated: Gilgoff believes that separation of mother and child in the hours after birth "may cause the permanent mal-adjustment of the new child, the family, and even society as a whole." A concise listing of danger signs might have been included, especially for first-time parents. Overall, though, a usable and heartening reference. (Kirkus Reviews) Couples contemplating childbirth at home will find both basic information and unbounded encouragement in this quite personal report. Gilgoff covers most contingencies, from medical issues and legal considerations to hot water and ice chips, and even suggests ways of answering tactless inquiries. Like Suzanne Arms in Immaculate Deception (1975), she repudiates the medical approach to childbirth, the "hospital mentality" which serves doctors instead of patients, keeps mothers passive and newborns out of reach, and she champions the role of the midwife or other experienced birth attendant (with emergency backup available). And, like most recent observers of pregnancy and childbirth, she criticizes American obstetrical practice: high cesarean rates and routine episiotomies, the required lithotomy position and little personalized care, the widespread use of drugs and fetal monitors, and, until recently, the preoccupation with weight gain rather than nutritional values. Consumer pressure, she avows, has already influenced hospital policies, but no hospital has the built-in advantages of home, glowingly described here. Her tone, however, will dismay some readers: as in Immaculate Deception, midwives are invariably "selfless" and informed while doctors and nurses are uppity and ignorant. Also, some claims are outsized and unsubstantiated: Gilgoff believes that separation of mother and child in the hours after birth "may cause the permanent mal-adjustment of the new child, the family, and even society as a whole." A concise listing of danger signs might have been included, especially for first-time parents. Overall, though, a usable and heartening reference. (Kirkus Reviews)

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Home Birth: An Invitation and a Guide - Gilgoff, Alice
Livre non disponible
(*)
Gilgoff, Alice:
Home Birth: An Invitation and a Guide - Livres de poche

1975, ISBN: 9780897891783

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: J F BERGIN & GARVEY], Couples contemplating childbirth at home will find both basic information and unbounded encouragement in this quite personal report. Gilgoff covers most contingencies, from medical issues and legal considerations to hot water and ice chips, and even suggests ways of answering tactless inquiries. Like Suzanne Arms in Immaculate Deception (1975), she repudiates the medical approach to childbirth, the "hospital mentality" which serves doctors instead of patients, keeps mothers passive and newborns out of reach, and she champions the role of the midwife or other experienced birth attendant (with emergency backup available). And, like most recent observers of pregnancy and childbirth, she criticizes American obstetrical practice: high cesarean rates and routine episiotomies, the required lithotomy position and little personalized care, the widespread use of drugs and fetal monitors, and, until recently, the preoccupation with weight gain rather than nutritional values. Consumer pressure, she avows, has already influenced hospital policies, but no hospital has the built-in advantages of home, glowingly described here. Her tone, however, will dismay some readers: as in Immaculate Deception, midwives are invariably "selfless" and informed while doctors and nurses are uppity and ignorant. Also, some claims are outsized and unsubstantiated: Gilgoff believes that separation of mother and child in the hours after birth "may cause the permanent mal-adjustment of the new child, the family, and even society as a whole." A concise listing of danger signs might have been included, especially for first-time parents. Overall, though, a usable and heartening reference. (Kirkus Reviews) Versandfertig in 2-4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

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Détails sur le livre

Couples contemplating childbirth at home will find both basic information and unbounded encouragement in this quite personal report. Gilgoff covers most contingencies, from medical issues and legal considerations to hot water and ice chips, and even suggests ways of answering tactless inquiries. Like Suzanne Arms in Immaculate Deception (1975), she repudiates the medical approach to childbirth, the "hospital mentality" which serves doctors instead of patients, keeps mothers passive and newborns out of reach, and she champions the role of the midwife or other experienced birth attendant (with emergency backup available). And, like most recent observers of pregnancy and childbirth, she criticizes American obstetrical practice: high cesarean rates and routine episiotomies, the required lithotomy position and little personalized care, the widespread use of drugs and fetal monitors, and, until recently, the preoccupation with weight gain rather than nutritional values. Consumer pressure, she avows, has already influenced hospital policies, but no hospital has the built-in advantages of home, glowingly described here. Her tone, however, will dismay some readers: as in Immaculate Deception, midwives are invariably "selfless" and informed while doctors and nurses are uppity and ignorant. Also, some claims are outsized and unsubstantiated: Gilgoff believes that separation of mother and child in the hours after birth "may cause the permanent mal-adjustment of the new child, the family, and even society as a whole." A concise listing of danger signs might have been included, especially for first-time parents. Overall, though, a usable and heartening reference. (Kirkus Reviews)

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Home Birth: An Invitation and a Guide


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780897891783
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0897891783
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 1988
Editeur: J F BERGIN & GARVEY
192 Pages
Poids: 0,249 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 04.04.2008 15:39:41
Livre trouvé récemment le 23.05.2011 11:48:16
ISBN/EAN: 9780897891783

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
0-89789-178-3, 978-0-89789-178-3


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