Français
France
s'inscrire
Conseils d'eurolivre.fr
Livres similaires
Autres livres qui pourraient ressembler au livre recherché:
Outils de recherche
Livre conseillé
Actualités
Publicité
FILTRE
- 0 Résultats
prix le plus bas: 21,95 €, prix le plus élevé: 24,95 €, prix moyen: 23,45 €
Faulkner and Southern Womanhood - Roberts, Diane
Livre non disponible
(*)
Roberts, Diane:
Faulkner and Southern Womanhood - Livres de poche

1995, ISBN: 0820317411, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9780820317410

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: UNIV OF GEORGIA PR, 264 Seiten, L=227mm, B=152mm, H=20mm, Gew.=490gr, [GR: 25720 - TB/Literaturwissenschaft/Gattungen u. Methoden], [SW: - Literature - Classics / Criticism], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: In Faulkner and Southern Womanhood, Diane Roberts examines the vexed and contradictory responses of the South's most celebrated novelist to the traditional representations of women that were bequeathed to him by his culture. The very mention of "the South", Roberts observes, conjures up a crazy quilt of images - from the romantic to the violent, from the gracious and glamorous to the backward and racist. The phrase "southern woman" likewise evokes a whole range of stock characters and stereotypes. Tracing the ways in which William Faulkner characterized women in his fiction, Roberts posits six familiar representations - the Confederate woman, the mammy, the tragic mulatta, the new belle, the spinster, and the mother - and, through close feminist readings, shown how the writer reactivated and reimagined them. In so doing, Roberts sees Faulkner as both a product and a producer of that multi-faceted place - and metaphor - called the South. "As a southerner", she writes, "Faulkner inherited the images, icons, and demons of his culture. They are part of the matter of the region with which he engages, sometimes accepting, sometimes rejecting". Drawing on extensive research into southern popular culture and the findings and interpretations of historians, Roberts demonstrates how Faulkner's greatest fiction, published during the 1920s and 1930s, grew out of his reactions to the South's attempts to redefine and solidify its hierarchical conceptions of race, gender, and class. During the era in which Faulkner's psyche was formed, the South's efforts to maintain its cultural stability included everything from lynching to erecting Confederate monuments and apotheosizing Gone with the Wind.Struggling to understand his region, Roberts says, Faulkner exposed the South's self-conceptions as quite precarious, with women slipping toward masculinity, men slipping toward femininity, and white identity slipping toward black. At their best, according to Roberts, Faulkner's no In Faulkner and Southern Womanhood, Diane Roberts examines the vexed and contradictory responses of the South's most celebrated novelist to the traditional representations of women that were bequeathed to him by his culture. The very mention of "the South", Roberts observes, conjures up a crazy quilt of images - from the romantic to the violent, from the gracious and glamorous to the backward and racist. The phrase "southern woman" likewise evokes a whole range of stock characters and stereotypes. Tracing the ways in which William Faulkner characterized women in his fiction, Roberts posits six familiar representations - the Confederate woman, the mammy, the tragic mulatta, the new belle, the spinster, and the mother - and, through close feminist readings, shown how the writer reactivated and reimagined them. In so doing, Roberts sees Faulkner as both a product and a producer of that multi-faceted place - and metaphor - called the South. "As a southerner", she writes, "Faulkner inherited the images, icons, and demons of his culture. They are part of the matter of the region with which he engages, sometimes accepting, sometimes rejecting". Drawing on extensive research into southern popular culture and the findings and interpretations of historians, Roberts demonstrates how Faulkner's greatest fiction, published during the 1920s and 1930s, grew out of his reactions to the South's attempts to redefine and solidify its hierarchical conceptions of race, gender, and class. During the era in which Faulkner's psyche was formed, the South's efforts to maintain its cultural stability included everything from lynching to erecting Confederate monuments and apotheosizing Gone with the Wind.Struggling to understand his region, Roberts says, Faulkner exposed the South's self-conceptions as quite precarious, with women slipping toward masculinity, men slipping toward femininity, and white identity slipping toward black. At their best, according to Roberts, Faulkner's no

Nouveaux livres DEU
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel) Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.
Faulkner and Southern Womanhood - Roberts, Diane
Livre non disponible
(*)
Roberts, Diane:
Faulkner and Southern Womanhood - Livres de poche

1930, ISBN: 9780820317410

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: UNIV OF GEORGIA PR], In Faulkner and Southern Womanhood, Diane Roberts examines the vexed and contradictory responses of the South's most celebrated novelist to the traditional representations of women that were bequeathed to him by his culture. The very mention of "the South", Roberts observes, conjures up a crazy quilt of images - from the romantic to the violent, from the gracious and glamorous to the backward and racist. The phrase "southern woman" likewise evokes a whole range of stock characters and stereotypes. Tracing the ways in which William Faulkner characterized women in his fiction, Roberts posits six familiar representations - the Confederate woman, the mammy, the tragic mulatta, the new belle, the spinster, and the mother - and, through close feminist readings, shown how the writer reactivated and reimagined them. In so doing, Roberts sees Faulkner as both a product and a producer of that multi-faceted place - and metaphor - called the South. "As a southerner", she writes, "Faulkner inherited the images, icons, and demons of his culture. They are part of the matter of the region with which he engages, sometimes accepting, sometimes rejecting". Drawing on extensive research into southern popular culture and the findings and interpretations of historians, Roberts demonstrates how Faulkner's greatest fiction, published during the 1920s and 1930s, grew out of his reactions to the South's attempts to redefine and solidify its hierarchical conceptions of race, gender, and class. During the era in which Faulkner's psyche was formed, the South's efforts to maintain its cultural stability included everything from lynching to erecting Confederate monuments and apotheosizing Gone with the Wind.Struggling to understand his region, Roberts says, Faulkner exposed the South's self-conceptions as quite precarious, with women slipping toward masculinity, men slipping toward femininity, and white identity slipping toward black. At their best, according to Roberts, Faulkner's noVersandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

Nouveaux livres Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei, Versand nach Deutschland (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.

Détails sur le livre
Faulkner and Southern Womanhood

In Faulkner and Southern Womanhood, Diane Roberts examines the vexed and contradictory responses of the South's most celebrated novelist to the traditional representations of women that were bequeathed to him by his culture. The very mention of "the South", Roberts observes, conjures up a crazy quilt of images - from the romantic to the violent, from the gracious and glamorous to the backward and racist. The phrase "southern woman" likewise evokes a whole range of stock characters and stereotypes. Tracing the ways in which William Faulkner characterized women in his fiction, Roberts posits six familiar representations - the Confederate woman, the mammy, the tragic mulatta, the new belle, the spinster, and the mother - and, through close feminist readings, shown how the writer reactivated and reimagined them. In so doing, Roberts sees Faulkner as both a product and a producer of that multi-faceted place - and metaphor - called the South. "As a southerner", she writes, "Faulkner inherited the images, icons, and demons of his culture. They are part of the matter of the region with which he engages, sometimes accepting, sometimes rejecting". Drawing on extensive research into southern popular culture and the findings and interpretations of historians, Roberts demonstrates how Faulkner's greatest fiction, published during the 1920s and 1930s, grew out of his reactions to the South's attempts to redefine and solidify its hierarchical conceptions of race, gender, and class. During the era in which Faulkner's psyche was formed, the South's efforts to maintain its cultural stability included everything from lynching to erecting Confederate monuments and apotheosizing Gone with the Wind.Struggling to understand his region, Roberts says, Faulkner exposed the South's self-conceptions as quite precarious, with women slipping toward masculinity, men slipping toward femininity, and white identity slipping toward black. At their best, according to Roberts, Faulkner's no

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Faulkner and Southern Womanhood


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780820317410
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0820317411
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 1995
Editeur: UNIV OF GEORGIA PR
264 Pages
Poids: 0,490 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 07.12.2007 11:05:06
Livre trouvé récemment le 27.02.2014 13:05:33
ISBN/EAN: 9780820317410

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
0-8203-1741-1, 978-0-8203-1741-0


< pour archiver...
Livres en relation