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Is the Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods Too Much Influenced by Civil Law and Should It Contain a Rule on the Passing of Property? - Benjamin Mahr
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Benjamin Mahr:
Is the Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods Too Much Influenced by Civil Law and Should It Contain a Rule on the Passing of Property? - nouveau livre

2013, ISBN: 9783638760584

ID: 9783638760584

Is the Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods Too Much Influenced by Civil Law and Should It Contain a Rule on the Passing of Property? : Paperback: Grin Verlag: 9783638760584: 30 Nov 2013: Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTION The Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] . Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTION The Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code - there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960's. The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. "It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states - such as France and the United States - which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules." Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was "deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York" and then circulated "among the governments of UN member st. Business & Management Books, , , , Is the Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods Too Much Influenced by Civil Law and Should It Contain a Rule on the Passing of Property?, Benjamin Mahr, 9783638760584, Grin Verlag, , , , ,, [PU: Grin-Verlag, München ]

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Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Mahr, Benjamin
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Mahr, Benjamin:
Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 9783638760584

[ED: Softcover], [PU: Grin Verlag], Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTION The Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code - there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960's. The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. "It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states - such as France and the United States - which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules." Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was "deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York" and then circulated "among the governments of UN member states for their opinions and comments". In 1980 CISG was concluded at the Vienna Convention and came into force in 1988. Today almost 60 countries have adopted CISG amongst which are most of the member states of the European Union (not the UK), USA, Canada, Australia and others. 2007. 20 S. 210 mm Versandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, DE, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot, offene Rechnung (Vorkasse vorbehalten)

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Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Benjamin Mahr
Livre non disponible
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Benjamin Mahr:
Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 3638760588

ID: 10407739746

[EAN: 9783638760584], Neubuch, [PU: Grin Verlag Nov 2007], This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. - Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, printed single-sided, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTIONThe Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960 s.The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states such as France and the United States which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules. Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York and then circulated among the governments of UN member states for their opinions and comments . In 1980 CISG was concluded at the Vienna Convention and came into force in 1988. Today almost 60 countries have adopted CISG amongst which are most of the member states of the European Union (not the UK), USA, Canada, Australia and others. 40 pp. Englisch

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Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Mahr, Benjamin
Livre non disponible
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Mahr, Benjamin:
Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 9783638760584

[ED: Softcover], [PU: Grin Verlag], Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, printed single-sided, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTIONThe Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960 s.The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states such as France and the United States which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules. Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York and then circulated among the governments of UN member states for their opinions and comments . In 1980 CISG was concluded at the Vienna Convention and came into force in 1988. Today almost 60 countries have adopted CISG amongst which are most of the member states of the European Union (not the UK), USA, Canada, Australia and others.2007. 20 S. 210 mmVersandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot

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Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Mahr, Benjamin
Livre non disponible
(*)
Mahr, Benjamin:
Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property? - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 9783638760584

[ED: Softcover], [PU: Grin Verlag], Essay from the year 2004 in the subject Business economics - Law, grade: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), course: International Business Law, language: English, abstract: INTRODUCTION The Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code - there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960's. The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. "It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states - such as France and the United States - which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules." Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was "deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York" and then circula 2007. 20 S. 210 mm Versandfertig in 3-5 Tagen, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot

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Détails sur le livre
Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property?

Essay aus dem Jahr 2004 im Fachbereich Wirtschaft - Recht, einseitig bedruckt, Note: Distinction (84%), The University of Sydney (Faculty of Law), Veranstaltung: International Business Law, Sprache: Englisch, Abstract: INTRODUCTION The Vienna Convention on International Sale of Goods [The Vienna Convention] is by far not the first attempt to harmonize international commercial code - there is a history of efforts to harmonization that goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. In 1930 the International Institute for the Unification of Private Law [UNIDROIT] was created in Europe. It developed its first draft sales law in 1935 and resumed its efforts in 1951 producing a draft commercial code which was circulated until the early 1960's. The first successful intermediate stage was reached, when in 1964 The Hague Conference adopted the Uniform Law for the International Sale of Goods [ULIS] and the Uniform Law for the Formation of Contracts [ULF]. High expectations accompanied the signing of the Hague Convention on Sales, but only a small number of countries ratified the Hague Convention and its application was strictly reduced to these member states. "It was especially disappointing that the Hague Conventions were not ratified by some of the signatory states - such as France and the United States - which had exercised considerable influence on the formulation of their rules." Despite the partial failure of the Hague Conventions international efforts to harmonization of sales law were still going on. In 1966 the United Nations founded The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law [UNCITRAL] which gave top priority to establishing a uniform international trade law. The efforts of a group comprised of 14 nations lead to the first draft text of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods [CISG] which was "deliberated at the eleventh session of UNCITRAL in 1978 in New York" and then circulated "among the governments of UN member states for their opinions and comments". In 1980 CISG was concluded at the Vienna Convention and came into force in 1988. Today almost 60 countries have adopted CISG amongst which are most of the member states of the European Union (not the UK), USA, Canada, Australia and others.

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Is the Vienna Convention on international sale of goods too much influenced by civil law and should it contain a rule on the passing of property?


EAN (ISBN-13): 9783638760584
ISBN (ISBN-10): 3638760588
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 2007
Editeur: GRIN Verlag
40 Pages
Poids: 0,075 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 16.01.2008 10:44:02
Livre trouvé récemment le 13.08.2017 02:31:19
ISBN/EAN: 3638760588

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
3-638-76058-8, 978-3-638-76058-4


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