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Into Suez - Stevie Davies
Livre non disponible
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Stevie Davies:
Into Suez - Livres de poche

2011, ISBN: 9781906998370

Edition reliée, ID: 372618840

New York : Columbia University Press, 2002. First Edition. An exceptional copy; fine in an equally fine dw, now mylar-sleeved. Particularly and surprisingly well-preserved; tight, bright, clean and especially sharp-cornered. Literally as new.; 525 pages; Description: xvi, 525 p., 32 p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Series: Film and culture. Subjects: Hearst, William Randolph (1863-1951) --Motion picture producers and directors --United States --Biography. Summary: Hollywood -- crossroads of filmmaking, mythmaking, and politics -- was dominated by one man more than any other for most of its history. It was William Randolph Hearst who understood how to use cinema to exploit the public's desire for entertainment and to create film propaganda to further his own desire for power. From the start, Hearst saw his future and the future of Hollywood as one and the same. He pioneered and capitalized on the synergistic relationship between yellow journalism and advertising and motion pictures. He sent movie cameramen to the inauguration of William McKinley and the front lines of the Spanish-American War. He played a prominent role in organizing film propaganda for both sides fighting World War I. By the 1910s, Hearst was producing his own pictures -- he ran one of the first animation studios and made many popular and controversial movie serials, including The Perils of Pauline (creating both the scenario and the catchphrase title) and Patria. As a feature film producer, Hearst was responsible for some of the most talked-about movies of the 1920s and 1930s. Behind the scenes in Hollywood, Hearst had few equals -- he was a much-feared power broker from the Silent Era to the Blacklisting Era. Hearst Over Hollywood draws on hundreds of previously unpublished letters and memos, FBI Freedom of Information files, and personal interviews to document the scope of Hearst's power in Hollywood. Louis Pizzitola tells the hidden story of Hearst's shaping influence on both film publicity and film censorship -- getting the word out and keeping it in check -- as well as the growth of the ""talkies, "" and the studio system. He details Hearst's anti-Semitism and anti-Communism, used to retaliate for Citizen Kane and to maintain dominance in the film industry, and exposes his secret film deal with Germany on the eve of World War II. The author also presents new insights into Hearst's relationships with Marion Davies, Will Hays, Louis B. Mayer, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mussolini, Hitler, and the Kennedys. Hearst Over Hollywood is a tour de force of biography, cultural study, and film history that reveals as never before the brilliance and darkness of Hearst's prophetic connection with Hollywood., New York : Columbia University Press, 2002, NP [Berlin, Germany?]: Jovis Verlag GmbH. 2000. F First English-language Edition. H Hardcover. Near Fine. Previous owner's rubberstamp on half-title page; else a nice, clean copy. 127 pages. "This book is about replications and their cinematic, literary and artistic reality" (lower cover); emphasis on film imagery from "Frankenstein" and "The Golem" through to Japanese anime and beyond. Contributions by Elisabeth Bronfen and 8 others; includes a few bibliographical references, plus acknowledgments ("Addenda"). Imprint of the Goethe Institut, Los Angeles on upper cover., Jovis Verlag GmbH, 2000, Collins, London, 1967. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good Condition/Good. 312 pp., translated by J. Maxwell Brownjohn, bibliography, index. Illustrated endpapers, by stamps which have a natural history theme. Throughout the text there are 13 sketch and distribution maps,1 double-paged, along with 15 coloured and 49 black and white photographs (many double-page). 62 of the photographs were taken especially for the author by Alan Root. Light blue coloured boards with gilt coloured titles to the backstrip. Photographic dustwrapper, showing a sugar glider in full flight, with white background and black and pale olive coloured titles to the front panel and backstrip. This book was originally published in Germany under the title "Vierfussige Australier", and tells the story of the director of the Frankfurt Zoo and his visit to Australia and New Guinea and what measures were being taken in the realms of conservation of the animal life. The corners are lightly rubbed and the head and the heel of the spine is lightly bumped. The corners of the dustwrapper slightly bumped and the dustwrapper is price clipped on front fold over bottom right-hand corner. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Please refer to accompanying picture (s). Quantity Available: 1. Category: Natural History & Resources; Australiana; Conservation ; Australia; Inventory No: 0100722. . This book weighs over 1 Kg packed and extra postal costs will be asked for when shipping outside Australia.., Collins, 1967, Parthian Books, UK, 2011. First Edition. Softcover. Very Good Condition. Available Now. Book Description: 1949: Egypt's struggle against its British occupiers moves towards crisis; Israel declares its statehood, driving out the Arabs; Joe Roberts, an RAF sergeant, his wife Ailsa and daughter, Nia, leave Wales for Egypt. "Into Suez" is a compelling human and political drama, set in the postwar period when Britain, the bankrupt victor of the Second World War, attempted to assert itself as an Imperial power in a world wholly altered. The novel is set in the run-up to the Suez Crisis, a template for future invasions (Iraq and Afghanistan being the most recent). In this moving story, Joe's tragedy is that of an ordinary working man of his generation: he's a lovely, humorous, emotional man in whom the common ration of racism and misogyny becomes a painful sickness. Ailsa, intelligent, curious and craving to explore the realities of the Egypt she enters, meets on the voyage out Mona, a Palestinian woman who excites in her yearning for a world beyond her horizons. When Joe's closest friend is murdered by Egyptian terrorists, their relationship spirals towards tragedy. Through it all, love remains. Looking back in old age, their daughter Nia follows in their wake to sail the Suez Canal with the aged Mona. Nia has been told her father was a war hero: now she will face a more painful truth. : Review: Alfred Hickling The Guardian, Saturday 24 April 2010 Stevie Davies is one of our most consistent and continually undervalued writers whose unsentimental, quietly revelatory novels have cropped up on the Booker and Orange shortlists without ever quite converting to a major prize. Into Suez, her 11th novel, deserves to be the one that brings wider renown, as it presents the most fully realised fusion of her personal and political histories to date. Into Suez by Stevie Davies 448pp, Parthian, GBP11.99 Buy Into Suez at the Guardian bookshop The idea for the book came while taking part in the 2003 protest in London against the Iraq war. Listening to the speeches in Hyde Park, Davies was reminded of Aneurin Bevan's words calling for a resolution to the Suez crisis in 1956: "The prime minister has been pretending that he has invaded Egypt in order to strengthen the United Nations. Every burglar could of course say the same thing, that he entered the house in order to train the police." Suez could be seen as the blueprint for every instance of disastrously mishandled Middle Eastern policy that followed. In Davies's story, Ailsa is an intelligent, self-sufficient young woman from the Welsh valleys who, accompanied by her young daughter Nia, sails out in 1947 to join her husband who is serving in the RAF at Ismalia in the Western Desert. Life in the world's largest military installation has some compensations, such as unrationed cherries in the company store. But the salt marshes of Suez are pitilessly inhospitable - "a lunar landscape as flat as Suffolk and sterile as death" - which leaves Ailsa to wonder "how many Arab labourers died to dig this ... ditch the Roberts family was arriving to defend as somehow British as the Manchester ship canal"? Wives of the rank and file are expected to keep their heads down and confine themselves to quarters. Yet Ailsa is spellbound by a sophisticated, dark-skinned concert pianist named Mona with whom she forms an attachment on the boat. Mona's husband is an Israeli army psychologist, which leads Ailsa to assume Mona must be Jewish; yet it transpires that she is an exiled Palestinian Arab. Also on the voyage is a young German refugee travelling to be reunited with her British husband and a querulous Welsh woman whose hostility towards anything foreign encapsulates the narrow, British fear of displacement. It's a cast of characters whose nationalities and circumstances are as confused and combustible as Suez itself; and though the story culminates in a distressingly well-executed denouement, Davies's main theme is what occurs when protocols are breached and privates' wives drawn into unguarded intimacy with the officer class. "What was Ailsa guilty of? Just getting out of line. Being, not even a black sheep, but a piebald sort of sheep in a field of whitish fleeces." As the daughter of an RAF officer herself, Davies has firsthand experience of being shunted round the remnants of empire: "The war had beggared and bankrupted Britain. We'd scuttled out of India and Palestine and we'd have to scuttle out of the rest of the Middle East. Scuttling was all we were good for." Davies first dealt with the traumas of being a bullied army child in 2001's The Element of Water; and her picture of the cruel indifference and blind prejudice of the British occupation of Egypt seems to have been further honed by her understanding of the average British forces boarding school. Davies frames the historical action with the contemporary account of Nia, who travels back to Egypt to meet her mother's friend Mona, still a celebrated and charismatic concert pianist in her old age. Nia's recollection of the 1950s is fragmentary, but formed of vivid impressions such as the sight of "stricken animals bleeding in the water". In one of the novel's most memorable scenes, we discover how bored British troops sailing to Suez used porpoises as target practice. "Ordered to do so, someone said. Uproar. Barbarians! Oh God, porpoises are only fish. Get a grip. Don't you eat fish and chips then?" It has to be pointed out to them that the creatures are warm-blooded mammals, like ourselves. But the incident serves as an example of Davies's remarkable ability to encapsulate imperial wrong-headedness in a single, indelibly recorded incident: cynical, gratuitous - neither sense nor purpose : About the Author: Stevie Davies was born in Swansea, Wales and spent a nomadic childhood in Egypt, Scotland and Germany. After studying at Manchester University, she went on to lecture there, returning to Swansea in 2001. She is Director of Creative Writing Swansea University. Stevie is both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Fellow of the Welsh Academy.She writes for the Guardian and Independent newspapers. INTO SUEZ is her eleventh novel. Her first, BOY BLUE (1987) won the Fawcett Society Book Prize in 1989. CLOSING THE BOOK (1994) was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Fawcett Society Book Prize. Her fifth novel, FOUR DREAMERS AND EMILY, described as 'poignant, funny and luminous' by Helen Dunmore, was published in 1996. THE WEB OF BELONGING (1997) was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Prize and the Portico prize and dramatized for ITV by Alan Plater. Her next novel, IMPASSIONED CLAY (1999) was also shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award. Her eighth novel, THE ELEMENT OF WATER (2001), was longlisted both for the Booker and the Orange Prizes and won the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award for 2002; Stevie adapted it as a radio play for BBC Radio 4. Her ninth novel, KITH AND KIN was longlisted for the Orange Prize and the film rights have been bought. THE EYRIE was published in 2007, to great acclaim. Stevie has also written thirteen books of literary criticism and history including UNBRIDLED SPIRITS: WOMEN OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION (1998). A CENTURY OF TROUBLES: ENGLAND 1600-1700 (2001) accompanied the Channel 4 series of documentary films about the century. Size: 3.2 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm. 448 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; ISBN: 190699837X. ISBN/EAN: 9781906998370. . 9781906998370, Parthian Books, 2011

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Into Suez - Stevie Davies
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Stevie Davies:
Into Suez - Livres de poche

2015, ISBN: 9781906998370

ID: 861860869

Publisher: Modernista | Utg. 2015 | | 367 p. | | This book is brand new. | Original title: Skin | Language: Svenska --- Information regarding the book: »Mo Hayder är en lysande deckarförfattare. Glöm bara inte att tända alla lampor först. Eller läs ute i solen. De kalla kårarna kommer definitivt ändå.« | GUNILLA WEDDING, SKÅNSKA DAGBLADET »När man just tror att allt är över och undrar varför det är så långt kvar i boken, skrämmer Mo Hayder vettet ur en!« | LOTTA OLSSON, DN När en ung kvinnas ruttnande kropp återfinns nära ett järnvägsspår utanför Bristol antyder såren på hennes handleder självmord. Det är också just så polisen vill ha det: snyggt och prydligt och enkelt att lägga till handlingarna. Men kriminalkommissarie Jack Caffery tvivlar. Fler synbara självmord dyker upp, alla med kopplingar till Älvgrottorna, ett nästan bottenlöst system av översvämmade gruvor. Caffery börjar ana en skugglik, mystisk varelse, någon som håller sig gömd i mörkret och osedd kan ta sig in i folks hus. Vid sidan av Caffery arbetar polisdykaren Flea Marley. Med sitt förflutnas trauman bakom sig har hon börjat undra om deras förhållande inte skulle kunna bli någonting mer än det yrkesmässiga. Men så upptäcker hon något som inte bara kommer henne obehagligt nära, det är så skrämmande att hennes liv aldrig kommer att bli detsamma. Och den här gången kan ingen - inte ens Jack - hjälpa henne. MO HAYDER [född 1962] är en brittisk kriminalförfattare som belönats med The Dagger in the Library för sitt samlade författarskap. Priset delas ut till »den levande kriminalförfattare som skänkt mest nöje till sina läsare« av Crime Writers Association. Hennes serie om Jack Caffery har sålt i över 2 miljoner exemplar. Hud är den fjärde boken om Jack Caffery. Mo Hayder är bosatt i Bath i England. »Förvridet blodtörstigt Hur motvilligt man än låter sig dras in handlingen, så är Mo Hayder lysande på att få en att läsa vidare.« | DAILY TELEGRAPH »Hud är gripande, komplex och uppslukande. Mo Hayder har en fängslande blick för det mörka.« | THE GUARDIAN »Som alltid hos Hayder är det otroligt otäckt men också starka känslor och människor att bry sig mycket om. Njutbart spännande.« | GUNILLA WEDDING, SKÅNSKA DAGBLADET | We have this book in our store house - please allow for a couple of extra days for delivery., Parthian Books, UK, 2011. First Edition. Softcover. Very Good Condition. Available Now. Book Description: 1949: Egypt's struggle against its British occupiers moves towards crisis; Israel declares its statehood, driving out the Arabs; Joe Roberts, an RAF sergeant, his wife Ailsa and daughter, Nia, leave Wales for Egypt. "Into Suez" is a compelling human and political drama, set in the postwar period when Britain, the bankrupt victor of the Second World War, attempted to assert itself as an Imperial power in a world wholly altered. The novel is set in the run-up to the Suez Crisis, a template for future invasions (Iraq and Afghanistan being the most recent). In this moving story, Joe's tragedy is that of an ordinary working man of his generation: he's a lovely, humorous, emotional man in whom the common ration of racism and misogyny becomes a painful sickness. Ailsa, intelligent, curious and craving to explore the realities of the Egypt she enters, meets on the voyage out Mona, a Palestinian woman who excites in her yearning for a world beyond her horizons. When Joe's closest friend is murdered by Egyptian terrorists, their relationship spirals towards tragedy. Through it all, love remains. Looking back in old age, their daughter Nia follows in their wake to sail the Suez Canal with the aged Mona. Nia has been told her father was a war hero: now she will face a more painful truth. : Review: Alfred Hickling The Guardian, Saturday 24 April 2010 Stevie Davies is one of our most consistent and continually undervalued writers whose unsentimental, quietly revelatory novels have cropped up on the Booker and Orange shortlists without ever quite converting to a major prize. Into Suez, her 11th novel, deserves to be the one that brings wider renown, as it presents the most fully realised fusion of her personal and political histories to date. Into Suez by Stevie Davies 448pp, Parthian, GBP11.99 Buy Into Suez at the Guardian bookshop The idea for the book came while taking part in the 2003 protest in London against the Iraq war. Listening to the speeches in Hyde Park, Davies was reminded of Aneurin Bevan's words calling for a resolution to the Suez crisis in 1956: "The prime minister has been pretending that he has invaded Egypt in order to strengthen the United Nations. Every burglar could of course say the same thing, that he entered the house in order to train the police." Suez could be seen as the blueprint for every instance of disastrously mishandled Middle Eastern policy that followed. In Davies's story, Ailsa is an intelligent, self-sufficient young woman from the Welsh valleys who, accompanied by her young daughter Nia, sails out in 1947 to join her husband who is serving in the RAF at Ismalia in the Western Desert. Life in the world's largest military installation has some compensations, such as unrationed cherries in the company store. But the salt marshes of Suez are pitilessly inhospitable - "a lunar landscape as flat as Suffolk and sterile as death" - which leaves Ailsa to wonder "how many Arab labourers died to dig this ... ditch the Roberts family was arriving to defend as somehow British as the Manchester ship canal"? Wives of the rank and file are expected to keep their heads down and confine themselves to quarters. Yet Ailsa is spellbound by a sophisticated, dark-skinned concert pianist named Mona with whom she forms an attachment on the boat. Mona's husband is an Israeli army psychologist, which leads Ailsa to assume Mona must be Jewish; yet it transpires that she is an exiled Palestinian Arab. Also on the voyage is a young German refugee travelling to be reunited with her British husband and a querulous Welsh woman whose hostility towards anything foreign encapsulates the narrow, British fear of displacement. It's a cast of characters whose nationalities and circumstances are as confused and combustible as Suez itself; and though the story culminates in a distressingly well-executed denouement, Davies's main theme is what occurs when protocols are breached and privates' wives drawn into unguarded intimacy with the officer class. "What was Ailsa guilty of? Just getting out of line. Being, not even a black sheep, but a piebald sort of sheep in a field of whitish fleeces." As the daughter of an RAF officer herself, Davies has firsthand experience of being shunted round the remnants of empire: "The war had beggared and bankrupted Britain. We'd scuttled out of India and Palestine and we'd have to scuttle out of the rest of the Middle East. Scuttling was all we were good for." Davies first dealt with the traumas of being a bullied army child in 2001's The Element of Water; and her picture of the cruel indifference and blind prejudice of the British occupation of Egypt seems to have been further honed by her understanding of the average British forces boarding school. Davies frames the historical action with the contemporary account of Nia, who travels back to Egypt to meet her mother's friend Mona, still a celebrated and charismatic concert pianist in her old age. Nia's recollection of the 1950s is fragmentary, but formed of vivid impressions such as the sight of "stricken animals bleeding in the water". In one of the novel's most memorable scenes, we discover how bored British troops sailing to Suez used porpoises as target practice. "Ordered to do so, someone said. Uproar. Barbarians! Oh God, porpoises are only fish. Get a grip. Don't you eat fish and chips then?" It has to be pointed out to them that the creatures are warm-blooded mammals, like ourselves. But the incident serves as an example of Davies's remarkable ability to encapsulate imperial wrong-headedness in a single, indelibly recorded incident: cynical, gratuitous - neither sense nor purpose : About the Author: Stevie Davies was born in Swansea, Wales and spent a nomadic childhood in Egypt, Scotland and Germany. After studying at Manchester University, she went on to lecture there, returning to Swansea in 2001. She is Director of Creative Writing Swansea University. Stevie is both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Fellow of the Welsh Academy.She writes for the Guardian and Independent newspapers. INTO SUEZ is her eleventh novel. Her first, BOY BLUE (1987) won the Fawcett Society Book Prize in 1989. CLOSING THE BOOK (1994) was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Fawcett Society Book Prize. Her fifth novel, FOUR DREAMERS AND EMILY, described as 'poignant, funny and luminous' by Helen Dunmore, was published in 1996. THE WEB OF BELONGING (1997) was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Prize and the Portico prize and dramatized for ITV by Alan Plater. Her next novel, IMPASSIONED CLAY (1999) was also shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award. Her eighth novel, THE ELEMENT OF WATER (2001), was longlisted both for the Booker and the Orange Prizes and won the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award for 2002; Stevie adapted it as a radio play for BBC Radio 4. Her ninth novel, KITH AND KIN was longlisted for the Orange Prize and the film rights have been bought. THE EYRIE was published in 2007, to great acclaim. Stevie has also written thirteen books of literary criticism and history including UNBRIDLED SPIRITS: WOMEN OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION (1998). A CENTURY OF TROUBLES: ENGLAND 1600-1700 (2001) accompanied the Channel 4 series of documentary films about the century. Size: 3.2 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm. 448 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; ISBN: 190699837X. ISBN/EAN: 9781906998370. . 9781906998370, Parthian Books, 2011

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Into Suez - Stevie Davies
Livre non disponible
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Stevie Davies:
Into Suez - Livres de poche

2011, ISBN: 9781906998370

Edition reliée, ID: 863686350

Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, UK, 1898. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good Condition/No Dust Jacket. viii, 104 pages, size 7 inches tall by 4.5 inches. Contents : I.-Legends Of The Saints : Legend Of Saint Christopher; Saint Joyce's Loaf Of Bread; Saint Austin And The Angel-Child; Saint Ursula; Saint Nicolas; Saint Laurence, Deacon And Martyr; Saint Martin, Bishop Of Tours; St. George The Martyr; St. George And The Dragon; King Eric's Faith; Salve Trophaeum Gloriae. II.-Other Verses : Esay's Vision; Jesus And The Moss; Saint John And The Little Worm; Belshazzar's Feast; Die Elle Der Zeit In Gott; Wachet Auf, Rufft Uns Die Stimme; Good Christen Men, 'Tis Time To Sing; A Christmas Tree; In Crucis Pendens Stipite; Holy Church Must Raise The Lay; Christus Pro Nobis Passus Est; To-Day We Tell The Story; God Is Gone Up On High To-Day; Harvest-Song; Spinn, Madchen, Spinn; Summer; A Prayer To Be Said On Going To Bed. III.-The Legend Of Saint Dorothy : The Legend Of Saint Dorothy, Virgin And Martyr. Book - in Very Good bright orange boards with gilt lettering - light bumping and light rubbing to the extreme corners and extreme ends of the spine. Contents, private library bookplate of the Community of the Epiphany to the free front endpaper, light browning otherwise clean and tightly bound. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 250 grams. Category: Religion & Theology; ., Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, 1898, Many of us believe that in order to please God, we have to be perfect. It's an easy lie to buy into. In a culture that emphasizes accomplishment and ever-higher goals, we feel driven to do more, achieve more, be more. And we get caught up in the unforgiving treadmill of self-imposed rules, believing that we should, we need to, we must.The result? Anger, frustration, and anxiety that keep us far away from the life of peace that Jesus promised.For years, Sandra McCollom lived in this trap. Finally worn out from striving for perfection but constantly feeling like a failure, one day she prayed in desperation, begging God for help. God answered Sandra by setting her on a life-changing journey to discover the riches of His grace., WaterBrook Press, Parthian Books, UK, 2011. First Edition. Softcover. Very Good Condition. Available Now. Book Description: 1949: Egypt's struggle against its British occupiers moves towards crisis; Israel declares its statehood, driving out the Arabs; Joe Roberts, an RAF sergeant, his wife Ailsa and daughter, Nia, leave Wales for Egypt. "Into Suez" is a compelling human and political drama, set in the postwar period when Britain, the bankrupt victor of the Second World War, attempted to assert itself as an Imperial power in a world wholly altered. The novel is set in the run-up to the Suez Crisis, a template for future invasions (Iraq and Afghanistan being the most recent). In this moving story, Joe's tragedy is that of an ordinary working man of his generation: he's a lovely, humorous, emotional man in whom the common ration of racism and misogyny becomes a painful sickness. Ailsa, intelligent, curious and craving to explore the realities of the Egypt she enters, meets on the voyage out Mona, a Palestinian woman who excites in her yearning for a world beyond her horizons. When Joe's closest friend is murdered by Egyptian terrorists, their relationship spirals towards tragedy. Through it all, love remains. Looking back in old age, their daughter Nia follows in their wake to sail the Suez Canal with the aged Mona. Nia has been told her father was a war hero: now she will face a more painful truth. : Review: Alfred Hickling The Guardian, Saturday 24 April 2010 Stevie Davies is one of our most consistent and continually undervalued writers whose unsentimental, quietly revelatory novels have cropped up on the Booker and Orange shortlists without ever quite converting to a major prize. Into Suez, her 11th novel, deserves to be the one that brings wider renown, as it presents the most fully realised fusion of her personal and political histories to date. Into Suez by Stevie Davies 448pp, Parthian, GBP11.99 Buy Into Suez at the Guardian bookshop The idea for the book came while taking part in the 2003 protest in London against the Iraq war. Listening to the speeches in Hyde Park, Davies was reminded of Aneurin Bevan's words calling for a resolution to the Suez crisis in 1956: "The prime minister has been pretending that he has invaded Egypt in order to strengthen the United Nations. Every burglar could of course say the same thing, that he entered the house in order to train the police." Suez could be seen as the blueprint for every instance of disastrously mishandled Middle Eastern policy that followed. In Davies's story, Ailsa is an intelligent, self-sufficient young woman from the Welsh valleys who, accompanied by her young daughter Nia, sails out in 1947 to join her husband who is serving in the RAF at Ismalia in the Western Desert. Life in the world's largest military installation has some compensations, such as unrationed cherries in the company store. But the salt marshes of Suez are pitilessly inhospitable - "a lunar landscape as flat as Suffolk and sterile as death" - which leaves Ailsa to wonder "how many Arab labourers died to dig this ... ditch the Roberts family was arriving to defend as somehow British as the Manchester ship canal"? Wives of the rank and file are expected to keep their heads down and confine themselves to quarters. Yet Ailsa is spellbound by a sophisticated, dark-skinned concert pianist named Mona with whom she forms an attachment on the boat. Mona's husband is an Israeli army psychologist, which leads Ailsa to assume Mona must be Jewish; yet it transpires that she is an exiled Palestinian Arab. Also on the voyage is a young German refugee travelling to be reunited with her British husband and a querulous Welsh woman whose hostility towards anything foreign encapsulates the narrow, British fear of displacement. It's a cast of characters whose nationalities and circumstances are as confused and combustible as Suez itself; and though the story culminates in a distressingly well-executed denouement, Davies's main theme is what occurs when protocols are breached and privates' wives drawn into unguarded intimacy with the officer class. "What was Ailsa guilty of? Just getting out of line. Being, not even a black sheep, but a piebald sort of sheep in a field of whitish fleeces." As the daughter of an RAF officer herself, Davies has firsthand experience of being shunted round the remnants of empire: "The war had beggared and bankrupted Britain. We'd scuttled out of India and Palestine and we'd have to scuttle out of the rest of the Middle East. Scuttling was all we were good for." Davies first dealt with the traumas of being a bullied army child in 2001's The Element of Water; and her picture of the cruel indifference and blind prejudice of the British occupation of Egypt seems to have been further honed by her understanding of the average British forces boarding school. Davies frames the historical action with the contemporary account of Nia, who travels back to Egypt to meet her mother's friend Mona, still a celebrated and charismatic concert pianist in her old age. Nia's recollection of the 1950s is fragmentary, but formed of vivid impressions such as the sight of "stricken animals bleeding in the water". In one of the novel's most memorable scenes, we discover how bored British troops sailing to Suez used porpoises as target practice. "Ordered to do so, someone said. Uproar. Barbarians! Oh God, porpoises are only fish. Get a grip. Don't you eat fish and chips then?" It has to be pointed out to them that the creatures are warm-blooded mammals, like ourselves. But the incident serves as an example of Davies's remarkable ability to encapsulate imperial wrong-headedness in a single, indelibly recorded incident: cynical, gratuitous - neither sense nor purpose : About the Author: Stevie Davies was born in Swansea, Wales and spent a nomadic childhood in Egypt, Scotland and Germany. After studying at Manchester University, she went on to lecture there, returning to Swansea in 2001. She is Director of Creative Writing Swansea University. Stevie is both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Fellow of the Welsh Academy.She writes for the Guardian and Independent newspapers. INTO SUEZ is her eleventh novel. Her first, BOY BLUE (1987) won the Fawcett Society Book Prize in 1989. CLOSING THE BOOK (1994) was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Fawcett Society Book Prize. Her fifth novel, FOUR DREAMERS AND EMILY, described as 'poignant, funny and luminous' by Helen Dunmore, was published in 1996. THE WEB OF BELONGING (1997) was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Prize and the Portico prize and dramatized for ITV by Alan Plater. Her next novel, IMPASSIONED CLAY (1999) was also shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award. Her eighth novel, THE ELEMENT OF WATER (2001), was longlisted both for the Booker and the Orange Prizes and won the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award for 2002; Stevie adapted it as a radio play for BBC Radio 4. Her ninth novel, KITH AND KIN was longlisted for the Orange Prize and the film rights have been bought. THE EYRIE was published in 2007, to great acclaim. Stevie has also written thirteen books of literary criticism and history including UNBRIDLED SPIRITS: WOMEN OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION (1998). A CENTURY OF TROUBLES: ENGLAND 1600-1700 (2001) accompanied the Channel 4 series of documentary films about the century. Size: 3.2 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm. 448 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; ISBN: 190699837X. ISBN/EAN: 9781906998370. . 9781906998370, Parthian Books, 2011

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Into Suez - Première édition

2011, ISBN: 9781906998370

Livres de poche, Edition reliée, ID: 811906522

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.: The Canadian Geographical Society, 1930. Interesting ads with illustrations including by Westinghouse, Jasper, Canadian Pacific, Banff, Royal Bank, Bank of Montreal, Leica with picture of early camera. CONTENTS - (1 )Landscape Painting in Canada by Ernest Fosbery, (2) The Story of Norway House by Robert Watson; (3) Some Fresh Glimpses of a Familiar River by Douglas Mackay; (4) Canberra - The Ottawa of Australia by Ivy Deakin Brookes; (5) Leaves from an Air-mail Pilot's Log by Captain D.S. Bondurant, (6) March of the Ten Thousand Greeks by E.C. Woodley >> Near FN example with Diangonal crease in cover & at spine, thus VG. First Edition By This Publisher,. Soft Cover. Very Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Trade Paperback Magazine., The Canadian Geographical Society, 1930, London: Amber Books, 2006. 1st edition, landscape large 8vo, 224pp, photo illustrations, line drawings; VG+/Fine Copy in VG+/Fine DJ. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/Very Good. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall., Amber Books, 2006, London England: Robert Hale. Very Good/Very Good. 1970. First Edition. Cloth. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall 0709113420 Harback Hardback. The country round Stratford-upon-Avon, where William Shakespeare was bred and where he died, is that Henry James called 'the core and centre of the English world; unmitigated England'; and the Royal Shakespeare Theatre at Stratford is the heart of the dramatist's country of the mind. This book, an affectionate portrait by a writer who is at once countryman and topographer, drama critic and Shakespearean, is a picture of Stratford through the years, of the face of south Warwichshire, of Arden and Feldon, battles, peoples, plays, and landscapes, great churches, hidden manors. The book is absorbing and individuao; and its illustrations match the text. Illustrated. 224 pp. (We carry a wide selection of titles in The Arts, Theology, History, Politics, Social and Physical Sciences. academic and scholarly books and Modern First Editions etc.) ., Robert Hale, 1970, Parthian Books, UK, 2011. First Edition. Softcover. Very Good Condition. Available Now. Book Description: 1949: Egypt's struggle against its British occupiers moves towards crisis; Israel declares its statehood, driving out the Arabs; Joe Roberts, an RAF sergeant, his wife Ailsa and daughter, Nia, leave Wales for Egypt. "Into Suez" is a compelling human and political drama, set in the postwar period when Britain, the bankrupt victor of the Second World War, attempted to assert itself as an Imperial power in a world wholly altered. The novel is set in the run-up to the Suez Crisis, a template for future invasions (Iraq and Afghanistan being the most recent). In this moving story, Joe's tragedy is that of an ordinary working man of his generation: he's a lovely, humorous, emotional man in whom the common ration of racism and misogyny becomes a painful sickness. Ailsa, intelligent, curious and craving to explore the realities of the Egypt she enters, meets on the voyage out Mona, a Palestinian woman who excites in her yearning for a world beyond her horizons. When Joe's closest friend is murdered by Egyptian terrorists, their relationship spirals towards tragedy. Through it all, love remains. Looking back in old age, their daughter Nia follows in their wake to sail the Suez Canal with the aged Mona. Nia has been told her father was a war hero: now she will face a more painful truth. : Review: Alfred Hickling The Guardian, Saturday 24 April 2010 Stevie Davies is one of our most consistent and continually undervalued writers whose unsentimental, quietly revelatory novels have cropped up on the Booker and Orange shortlists without ever quite converting to a major prize. Into Suez, her 11th novel, deserves to be the one that brings wider renown, as it presents the most fully realised fusion of her personal and political histories to date. Into Suez by Stevie Davies 448pp, Parthian, GBP11.99 Buy Into Suez at the Guardian bookshop The idea for the book came while taking part in the 2003 protest in London against the Iraq war. Listening to the speeches in Hyde Park, Davies was reminded of Aneurin Bevan's words calling for a resolution to the Suez crisis in 1956: "The prime minister has been pretending that he has invaded Egypt in order to strengthen the United Nations. Every burglar could of course say the same thing, that he entered the house in order to train the police." Suez could be seen as the blueprint for every instance of disastrously mishandled Middle Eastern policy that followed. In Davies's story, Ailsa is an intelligent, self-sufficient young woman from the Welsh valleys who, accompanied by her young daughter Nia, sails out in 1947 to join her husband who is serving in the RAF at Ismalia in the Western Desert. Life in the world's largest military installation has some compensations, such as unrationed cherries in the company store. But the salt marshes of Suez are pitilessly inhospitable - "a lunar landscape as flat as Suffolk and sterile as death" - which leaves Ailsa to wonder "how many Arab labourers died to dig this ... ditch the Roberts family was arriving to defend as somehow British as the Manchester ship canal"? Wives of the rank and file are expected to keep their heads down and confine themselves to quarters. Yet Ailsa is spellbound by a sophisticated, dark-skinned concert pianist named Mona with whom she forms an attachment on the boat. Mona's husband is an Israeli army psychologist, which leads Ailsa to assume Mona must be Jewish; yet it transpires that she is an exiled Palestinian Arab. Also on the voyage is a young German refugee travelling to be reunited with her British husband and a querulous Welsh woman whose hostility towards anything foreign encapsulates the narrow, British fear of displacement. It's a cast of characters whose nationalities and circumstances are as confused and combustible as Suez itself; and though the story culminates in a distressingly well-executed denouement, Davies's main theme is what occurs when protocols are breached and privates' wives drawn into unguarded intimacy with the officer class. "What was Ailsa guilty of? Just getting out of line. Being, not even a black sheep, but a piebald sort of sheep in a field of whitish fleeces." As the daughter of an RAF officer herself, Davies has firsthand experience of being shunted round the remnants of empire: "The war had beggared and bankrupted Britain. We'd scuttled out of India and Palestine and we'd have to scuttle out of the rest of the Middle East. Scuttling was all we were good for." Davies first dealt with the traumas of being a bullied army child in 2001's The Element of Water; and her picture of the cruel indifference and blind prejudice of the British occupation of Egypt seems to have been further honed by her understanding of the average British forces boarding school. Davies frames the historical action with the contemporary account of Nia, who travels back to Egypt to meet her mother's friend Mona, still a celebrated and charismatic concert pianist in her old age. Nia's recollection of the 1950s is fragmentary, but formed of vivid impressions such as the sight of "stricken animals bleeding in the water". In one of the novel's most memorable scenes, we discover how bored British troops sailing to Suez used porpoises as target practice. "Ordered to do so, someone said. Uproar. Barbarians! Oh God, porpoises are only fish. Get a grip. Don't you eat fish and chips then?" It has to be pointed out to them that the creatures are warm-blooded mammals, like ourselves. But the incident serves as an example of Davies's remarkable ability to encapsulate imperial wrong-headedness in a single, indelibly recorded incident: cynical, gratuitous - neither sense nor purpose : About the Author: Stevie Davies was born in Swansea, Wales and spent a nomadic childhood in Egypt, Scotland and Germany. After studying at Manchester University, she went on to lecture there, returning to Swansea in 2001. She is Director of Creative Writing Swansea University. Stevie is both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Fellow of the Welsh Academy.She writes for the Guardian and Independent newspapers. INTO SUEZ is her eleventh novel. Her first, BOY BLUE (1987) won the Fawcett Society Book Prize in 1989. CLOSING THE BOOK (1994) was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Fawcett Society Book Prize. Her fifth novel, FOUR DREAMERS AND EMILY, described as 'poignant, funny and luminous' by Helen Dunmore, was published in 1996. THE WEB OF BELONGING (1997) was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Prize and the Portico prize and dramatized for ITV by Alan Plater. Her next novel, IMPASSIONED CLAY (1999) was also shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award. Her eighth novel, THE ELEMENT OF WATER (2001), was longlisted both for the Booker and the Orange Prizes and won the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award for 2002; Stevie adapted it as a radio play for BBC Radio 4. Her ninth novel, KITH AND KIN was longlisted for the Orange Prize and the film rights have been bought. THE EYRIE was published in 2007, to great acclaim. Stevie has also written thirteen books of literary criticism and history including UNBRIDLED SPIRITS: WOMEN OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION (1998). A CENTURY OF TROUBLES: ENGLAND 1600-1700 (2001) accompanied the Channel 4 series of documentary films about the century. Size: 3.2 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm. 448 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; ISBN: 190699837X. ISBN/EAN: 9781906998370. . 9781906998370, Parthian Books, 2011

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Into Suez - Stevie Davies
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Into Suez - Livres de poche

2011, ISBN: 9781906998370

Edition reliée, ID: 863686350

Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, UK, 1898. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good Condition/No Dust Jacket. viii, 104 pages, size 7 inches tall by 4.5 inches. Contents : I.-Legends Of The Saints : Legend Of Saint Christopher; Saint Joyce's Loaf Of Bread; Saint Austin And The Angel-Child; Saint Ursula; Saint Nicolas; Saint Laurence, Deacon And Martyr; Saint Martin, Bishop Of Tours; St. George The Martyr; St. George And The Dragon; King Eric's Faith; Salve Trophaeum Gloriae. II.-Other Verses : Esay's Vision; Jesus And The Moss; Saint John And The Little Worm; Belshazzar's Feast; Die Elle Der Zeit In Gott; Wachet Auf, Rufft Uns Die Stimme; Good Christen Men, 'Tis Time To Sing; A Christmas Tree; In Crucis Pendens Stipite; Holy Church Must Raise The Lay; Christus Pro Nobis Passus Est; To-Day We Tell The Story; God Is Gone Up On High To-Day; Harvest-Song; Spinn, Madchen, Spinn; Summer; A Prayer To Be Said On Going To Bed. III.-The Legend Of Saint Dorothy : The Legend Of Saint Dorothy, Virgin And Martyr. Book - in Very Good bright orange boards with gilt lettering - light bumping and light rubbing to the extreme corners and extreme ends of the spine. Contents, private library bookplate of the Community of the Epiphany to the free front endpaper, light browning otherwise clean and tightly bound. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 250 grams. Category: Religion & Theology; ., Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co, 1898, Parthian Books, UK, 2011. First Edition. Softcover. Very Good Condition. Available Now. Book Description: 1949: Egypt's struggle against its British occupiers moves towards crisis; Israel declares its statehood, driving out the Arabs; Joe Roberts, an RAF sergeant, his wife Ailsa and daughter, Nia, leave Wales for Egypt. "Into Suez" is a compelling human and political drama, set in the postwar period when Britain, the bankrupt victor of the Second World War, attempted to assert itself as an Imperial power in a world wholly altered. The novel is set in the run-up to the Suez Crisis, a template for future invasions (Iraq and Afghanistan being the most recent). In this moving story, Joe's tragedy is that of an ordinary working man of his generation: he's a lovely, humorous, emotional man in whom the common ration of racism and misogyny becomes a painful sickness. Ailsa, intelligent, curious and craving to explore the realities of the Egypt she enters, meets on the voyage out Mona, a Palestinian woman who excites in her yearning for a world beyond her horizons. When Joe's closest friend is murdered by Egyptian terrorists, their relationship spirals towards tragedy. Through it all, love remains. Looking back in old age, their daughter Nia follows in their wake to sail the Suez Canal with the aged Mona. Nia has been told her father was a war hero: now she will face a more painful truth. : Review: Alfred Hickling The Guardian, Saturday 24 April 2010 Stevie Davies is one of our most consistent and continually undervalued writers whose unsentimental, quietly revelatory novels have cropped up on the Booker and Orange shortlists without ever quite converting to a major prize. Into Suez, her 11th novel, deserves to be the one that brings wider renown, as it presents the most fully realised fusion of her personal and political histories to date. Into Suez by Stevie Davies 448pp, Parthian, GBP11.99 Buy Into Suez at the Guardian bookshop The idea for the book came while taking part in the 2003 protest in London against the Iraq war. Listening to the speeches in Hyde Park, Davies was reminded of Aneurin Bevan's words calling for a resolution to the Suez crisis in 1956: "The prime minister has been pretending that he has invaded Egypt in order to strengthen the United Nations. Every burglar could of course say the same thing, that he entered the house in order to train the police." Suez could be seen as the blueprint for every instance of disastrously mishandled Middle Eastern policy that followed. In Davies's story, Ailsa is an intelligent, self-sufficient young woman from the Welsh valleys who, accompanied by her young daughter Nia, sails out in 1947 to join her husband who is serving in the RAF at Ismalia in the Western Desert. Life in the world's largest military installation has some compensations, such as unrationed cherries in the company store. But the salt marshes of Suez are pitilessly inhospitable - "a lunar landscape as flat as Suffolk and sterile as death" - which leaves Ailsa to wonder "how many Arab labourers died to dig this ... ditch the Roberts family was arriving to defend as somehow British as the Manchester ship canal"? Wives of the rank and file are expected to keep their heads down and confine themselves to quarters. Yet Ailsa is spellbound by a sophisticated, dark-skinned concert pianist named Mona with whom she forms an attachment on the boat. Mona's husband is an Israeli army psychologist, which leads Ailsa to assume Mona must be Jewish; yet it transpires that she is an exiled Palestinian Arab. Also on the voyage is a young German refugee travelling to be reunited with her British husband and a querulous Welsh woman whose hostility towards anything foreign encapsulates the narrow, British fear of displacement. It's a cast of characters whose nationalities and circumstances are as confused and combustible as Suez itself; and though the story culminates in a distressingly well-executed denouement, Davies's main theme is what occurs when protocols are breached and privates' wives drawn into unguarded intimacy with the officer class. "What was Ailsa guilty of? Just getting out of line. Being, not even a black sheep, but a piebald sort of sheep in a field of whitish fleeces." As the daughter of an RAF officer herself, Davies has firsthand experience of being shunted round the remnants of empire: "The war had beggared and bankrupted Britain. We'd scuttled out of India and Palestine and we'd have to scuttle out of the rest of the Middle East. Scuttling was all we were good for." Davies first dealt with the traumas of being a bullied army child in 2001's The Element of Water; and her picture of the cruel indifference and blind prejudice of the British occupation of Egypt seems to have been further honed by her understanding of the average British forces boarding school. Davies frames the historical action with the contemporary account of Nia, who travels back to Egypt to meet her mother's friend Mona, still a celebrated and charismatic concert pianist in her old age. Nia's recollection of the 1950s is fragmentary, but formed of vivid impressions such as the sight of "stricken animals bleeding in the water". In one of the novel's most memorable scenes, we discover how bored British troops sailing to Suez used porpoises as target practice. "Ordered to do so, someone said. Uproar. Barbarians! Oh God, porpoises are only fish. Get a grip. Don't you eat fish and chips then?" It has to be pointed out to them that the creatures are warm-blooded mammals, like ourselves. But the incident serves as an example of Davies's remarkable ability to encapsulate imperial wrong-headedness in a single, indelibly recorded incident: cynical, gratuitous - neither sense nor purpose : About the Author: Stevie Davies was born in Swansea, Wales and spent a nomadic childhood in Egypt, Scotland and Germany. After studying at Manchester University, she went on to lecture there, returning to Swansea in 2001. She is Director of Creative Writing Swansea University. Stevie is both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Fellow of the Welsh Academy.She writes for the Guardian and Independent newspapers. INTO SUEZ is her eleventh novel. Her first, BOY BLUE (1987) won the Fawcett Society Book Prize in 1989. CLOSING THE BOOK (1994) was longlisted for the Booker Prize and shortlisted for the Fawcett Society Book Prize. Her fifth novel, FOUR DREAMERS AND EMILY, described as 'poignant, funny and luminous' by Helen Dunmore, was published in 1996. THE WEB OF BELONGING (1997) was shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Prize and the Portico prize and dramatized for ITV by Alan Plater. Her next novel, IMPASSIONED CLAY (1999) was also shortlisted for the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award. Her eighth novel, THE ELEMENT OF WATER (2001), was longlisted both for the Booker and the Orange Prizes and won the Arts Council of Wales Book of the Year Award for 2002; Stevie adapted it as a radio play for BBC Radio 4. Her ninth novel, KITH AND KIN was longlisted for the Orange Prize and the film rights have been bought. THE EYRIE was published in 2007, to great acclaim. Stevie has also written thirteen books of literary criticism and history including UNBRIDLED SPIRITS: WOMEN OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION (1998). A CENTURY OF TROUBLES: ENGLAND 1600-1700 (2001) accompanied the Channel 4 series of documentary films about the century. Size: 3.2 x 13.3 x 19.7 cm. 448 pages. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; ISBN: 190699837X. ISBN/EAN: 9781906998370. . 9781906998370, Parthian Books, 2011

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Détails sur le livre
Into Suez
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An epic novel of passionate love and murderous violence, set in the postwar period. Follows an RAF sergeant, his wife and daughter, as they move from Wales to Egypt in 1949. There will be an author interview on BBC Radio 4's "Excess Baggage", and it will appear on the front of "The Bookseller".

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Into Suez


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781906998370
ISBN (ISBN-10): 190699837X
Version reliée
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 2011
Editeur: Parthian Books
Poids: 0,369 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 24.03.2011 16:06:44
Livre trouvé récemment le 12.09.2017 18:04:18
ISBN/EAN: 190699837X

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
1-906998-37-X, 978-1-906998-37-0


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