Français
France
s'inscrire
Conseils d'eurolivre.fr
Livres similaires
Autres livres qui pourraient ressembler au livre recherché:
Outils de recherche
Livre conseillé
Actualités
Publicité
FILTRE
- 0 Résultats
prix le plus bas: 22,95 €, prix le plus élevé: 27,45 €, prix moyen: 24,58 €
Stepchildren of France - Odic, Charles
Livre non disponible
(*)
Odic, Charles:
Stepchildren of France - Livres de poche

2007, ISBN: 1406771694, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406771695

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: GAYLEY PR, 188 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=11mm, Gew.=245gr, [GR: 25500 - TB/Geschichte], [SW: - History - General History], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them... Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them...

Nouveaux livres DEU
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel) Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.
Stepchildren of France - Odic, Charles
Livre non disponible
(*)
Odic, Charles:
Stepchildren of France - Livres de poche

ISBN: 9781406771695

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: GAYLEY PR], Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them...Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

Nouveaux livres Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei, Versand nach Deutschland (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.
Stepchildren of France - Odic, Charles
Livre non disponible
(*)
Odic, Charles:
Stepchildren of France - Livres de poche

ISBN: 9781406771695

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: GAYLEY PR], Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them...Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

Nouveaux livres Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.
Stepchildren of France - Odic, Charles
Livre non disponible
(*)
Odic, Charles:
Stepchildren of France - Livres de poche

1943, ISBN: 9781406771695

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: GAYLEY PR], Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them...Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

Nouveaux livres Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Frais d'envoiVersandkostenfrei, Versand nach Deutschland (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Livre non disponible signifie que le livre est actuellement pas disponible à l'une des plates-formes associées nous recherche.

Détails sur le livre
Stepchildren of France

Charles STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Translated from the French ly HENRY NOBLE HALL ROY PUBLISHERS NEW YORK Publishers Note nn JLHE author of this book is a distinguished French physi cian, member of an old Catholic family of Brittany. At the time his manuscript was scheduled for publication it was the intention of the Publisher at the request of the authors fam ily that it be issued under a pseudonym concealing the au thors true identity. This was necessary because the author had been seized by the Germans and interned as a hostage in the infamous concentration camp of Buchenwald. He knew too much and had seen too much of the blessings of Nazi kultur in his native Paris to be allowed at large by Hitler and his col laborationists. Now Dr. Odic is back in Paris, his safety and the safety of his family no longer require the shield of anonymity. Here then, seen through the compassionate eyes of a dis tinguished practitioner, is a record which presents the naked and shameful truth of a black chapter in the history of man kind. STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE Contents I. HOW THE TRUCK DRIVER FELT ... I II. SAMMY . . . . .4 III. SUFFER LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME ...... 13 IV. THE ETHICS OF HATE .... 42 V. BEAUME-LA-ROLANDE . . . 6 1 VI. PLAIN TALES OF HOSTAGES 73 VIL JOURNEY TO PITCH-POINT ... 82 VIII. ROYALLD5U . . . . . 113 IX. THE TRUTH ABOUT THE VELODROME DRIVER 1 3 5 X. JULY 5, 1943 151 XL THE WHISTLING NON-COM . . . 1 68 XII. NATIONAL WAR . . . . - 175 STEPCHILDREN of FRANCE CHAPTER I How the Truck Driver Felt V VHEN I STARTED to investigate the persecution of the Jews in Paris, chance threw me across Allanet, a truck driver. It was not the racial problem that led us into conversa tion. Allanet, in front of my door, was struggling with his truck which refused to budge. They were no mean opponents. The truck a huge and ancient American lorry obstinately silent, blocked half the street. In front of it an enormous pair of shoulders rose and fell with the rhythm of a dance. In vain. The truck would not come to life. It did so at last and so sud denly that the pair of shoulders was sent hurtling through space. I went to render aid. A kickback of the crank had broken the truck drivers arm. This accident, which did not seem to bother him very much, was what led to our acquaintance. I work for the Boches, he said, just as simply as he might have told me he was working at Renaults. Their money doesnt cost them much. That was all. Later on, with some misgiving, I asked the truck driver how he liked working for the Boches. He was the kind of man who has little use for sentiment. Powerful, a nose like a doorknob, a round and ruddy face with small, sharp eyes, 2 Stepchildren of France all neck and torso and fists, he was evidently not one of those Frenchmen that defeat had hit hard. One has got to know them he answered, there are no worse swine Have they treated you badly Are you joking Just look at me He bunched up the muscles of his uninjured arm. Then dont they pay you well One cant complain. No one is more thick-headed than a Boche, but there is no worse grafter. I make a good living. Well The truck driver looked at me with an almost painful stare, and mastering the anger that shook his bulky frame, said What disgusts me is to have to eat their bread. One has to have an empty belly. Im not talking about the war. The Boches live by it thats the truth. So much the worse for us. We wereblind. We were beaten. Theres nothing to say. One had to get along somehow, but . . . What There are things that open your eyes. After a moments silence, the truck driver went on. I was on duty with my truck at the Velodrome dHiver. I was struck by the curiously solemn way Allanet said Velo drome dHiver. If he had been talking of bicycle races, he would have said VeLdHiv. To have seen that was plenty. Dyou hear Theres no worse vermin than the Boches. That day I said to myself Tfoure in it. Youre wise to them...

Informations détaillées sur le livre - Stepchildren of France


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406771695
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406771694
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 2007
Editeur: GAYLEY PR
188 Pages
Poids: 0,245 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 06.05.2009 08:26:43
Livre trouvé récemment le 07.01.2014 12:42:02
ISBN/EAN: 1406771694

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
1-4067-7169-4, 978-1-4067-7169-5


< pour archiver...
Livres en relation