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The Death Of Turnus - W. Warde Fowler
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W. Warde Fowler:

The Death Of Turnus - Livres de poche

ISBN: 9781443774802

ID: 578588142

RareBooksClub. Paperback. New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 74 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.1in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: . . . right hand is nearer the bosom, the second finger resting upon the centre of it; the left hand supports a drapery. But both are represented in a riper age, and even larger than the Venus de Medici. A shape of beautiful maidenhood, resembling hers, may be seen in the half-draped Thetis, of the size of life, in the villa Albani, who appears here of the age when she was given in marriage to Peleus: this statue will be described hereafter, in the second chapter of the twelfth book. 4. The celestial Venus, daughter of Jupiter and Harmonia, is different from the other Venus, who is the daughter of Dione. She is distinguished by a high diadem of the kind peculiar to Juno; a similar diadem is also worn by a Venus victrix, victorious. The most beautiful known statue of her was discovered in the theatre of the ancient city of Capua; the arms are wanting, and her left foot rests upon a helmet. It is now in the royal palace at Caserta. A diadem of the same kind may also be seen, in some reliefs which represent the rape of Proserpine, on the head of a draped Venus, who is gathering flowers in company with Pallas, Diana, and Proserpine, in the fields of Enna, in Sicily. But it can be observed the most distinctly on two sepulchral urns in the palace Barberini. This head-ornament has been given to no other goddesses than these, with the exception of Thetis, who bears it on her head in a painting on a beautiful vase of burnt clay in the Vatican library, of which an engraving may be seen in my Ancient Monuments. a Also Diana, as Visconti shows (Mus. Pio-Clement. , Vol. I. Plate 10, Note 6). --F. b Heyne seeks to prove, from many odea to be found in the Greek Anthology, that the Medicean Venus is to be considered as standing before Paris; and Bottiger, in. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN., RareBooksClub, RareBooksClub. Paperback. New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 82 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.2in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1825 edition. Excerpt: . . . used in speakiDg of it, the reader is refered to some treaties on conic sections. W OP Comets. How do the inclinations of their orbits to the ecliptic, compare with that of the orbits of the primary planets f They are, in general, much larger, with the exception of that of Pallas, which approaches somewhat to the mean inclination of those comets whose inclinations have been calculated. In this respect also the comets appear to differ from the planets. What have you to say concerning the quantity of matter that the comets generally contain The quantity which they contain, appears in general to be but small. For they have but a very feeble action on other bodies. What is here said, may be illustrated by the comet of 1454, which is said to have eclipsed the moon, so that it must have been very near to the earth. Yet it produced no sensible effect on the earths motions. The comets of 1472, and of 1760, also, came very near the earth; yet their attractions produced no sensible effect on the earths motions. Also, the comet of 1770 came very near the satellites of Jupiter, but produced no derangement in the system. Has any comet ever been known to returnr after having disappeared The only comet which is known with absolute certainty to have returned, is that of 1682; which, according to the prediction of Dr. Halley, reappeared in 1759. The period of this comet, is between 75 and 76 years. The re- turn of some of the other comets is probable, though not certain. The great comet of 1680 was supposed, by Dr. Halley, to have a period of 575 years. How many comets have hitherto been observed The whole number which have been hitherto observed, and recorded, with more or less accuracy, is 350. It is, however, supposed by some astronomers, that about . . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN., RareBooksClub, RareBooksClub. Paperback. New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 116 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.2in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 Excerpt: . . . as well as Pallas, Aphrodite, Hermes, and Bacchus, in other Greek inscriptions108, and among the ancient Romans the usage was still more generally prevalent109. It seems that the spread of Christianity so gently interfered with this Pagan practice, that words, derived from the old religion of the country, may still be hourly heard in the mouth of any Christian peasant of Greece or Turkey, even in the nineteenth century of our era. Nevertheless, here, as in most parts of Christendom, the names of the favourite saints are those generally bestowed in baptism110: thus a Demetrios and a Constantine, a Spyridon and a Basil, are found in every village111. The inferior deities of the ancient mythology 107 Boeckh, Corpus Inscr. n. 251. 108 Welcker, Syllog. Epigr. Graec. n. 76. 87. 120. 109 As is observed by Welcker, 1. c. p. 166. 110 The inhabitants of the young Othos kingdom, who have given themselves the name of Hellenes, have, at all events in the large towns, introduced great innovations into the baptismal vocabulary. The petty shopkeeper of Syra or Nauplia, himself a Yannaki or a Dhemetraki, has lately heard so much talk about the ancient Hellenes, whose name the nation has assumed, that he has taken care to number among his children an Achilles or a Demosthenes! 111 The derivation of Greek names, of a Christian origin, can sometimes be traced to a higher source than the Saints. Derivatives from the name of Christ, as Khristddhulos, are common. The ancients also had many names derived, but without composition, from those of Deities, as from Demeter, Demetrios; from Poseidon, Poseidonios; from Hephaestos, Hephaestion, and c. See Barthelemy, Voyage du Jeune Anacharse, c. Lxvi. and Welcker, 1. c. p. 166. The simple name of Christ, Khrist. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN., RareBooksClub, RareBooksClub. Paperback. New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 122 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.3in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 Excerpt: . . . excursion to the coast of Sussex was made in June, 1754, in which he enjoyed the assistance of Ehret, who was both a skilful botanist and artist. The fruits of this expedition appeared in the 48th vol. of the Transactions of the Royal Society, in the form of various letters to the well-known naturalist, Peter Collison. Another expedition, to the north coast of Kent, was undertaken in the autumn of the same year, along with (Eder, a distinguished Danish botanist; and many important points were determined regarding the mode of propagation among corallines. The result of all his investigations on the subject was laid before the public in 1755, in his Essay towards a Natural History of the Corallines, and other Marine Productions of the like Kind, commonly found on the Coasts of Great Britain and Ireland; a work which has established his character as an accurate and philosophical observer, and has been the source of nearly all our knowledge respecting these productions almost to the present day. Whatever occurred to him subsequently to the publication of this work, as further illustrative of the subject, was communicated to the Royal Society, and will be found in their Transactions. His opinions respecting the animality of corallines, although founded on such demonstrable facts, were very far from meeting with universal concurrence. Some of the principal naturalists of the day opposed them; Dr. Job Baster, if not the most able, was one of the most violent, of his combatants; Pallas, sir John Hill, and many others, adhered to the old opinion. Even Linnseus, his frequent correspondent, adopted his views in a very modified sense, --regardingthe natural productions in question as partly of a vegetable and partly of an animal nature; vegetables with respect to their . . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN., RareBooksClub, Dyer Press. Paperback. New. Paperback. 168 pages. Dimensions: 8.4in. x 5.5in. x 0.5in.INTRODUCTORY NOTE AFTER the publication of Aeneas at the Site of Rome, I went on to the ninth and following books, relieving by such studies the constant anxiety of last winter and spring 1917-18. These last books of the Aeneid seemed to me to demand more knowledge of things Roman and Italian than the earlier ones and a long experience of life and thought in ancient Italy is my only real justification for attempting to illuminate any part of Virgils poems. Once more, then, I venture some observations on a single book, encouraged by much friendly correspondence and criticism. The choice of the twelfth book is explained by the fact that it is the only one of the last four which contains a complete story in itself, while at the same time it forms a magnificent conclusion to the greater story of the whole epic. I may add that it is in my judgment the poets most mature work, and reveah his mind more fully to those who study it closely than any other book but the sixth and I The Death of Turnus that its great wealth of detail and incident, its psychological subtlety, and the comparative difficulty of its language, give it a claim to closer study and more leisurely reflection than any other book in the poem. It is, indeed, so full of dctail and difficulty that it is not easy to grasp the story it tells and to keep it in thc memory. It may be of some use to the reader if, instead of a synopsis-still more bewildering than the poetry, 1 venture to suggest that the book falls conveniently into three parts or acts, of which the first and third are the shortest and most important, and thc second the longest and least interesting to a modern. In the first act down to line 215 we have the earnest endeavour of Aencas and Latinus to make a fair and lasting peace between Trojans and Latins, in accordance with the decrees of Fate. Turnus, however, claims his right to thc hand of Lavinia, and the right to dobattle for it with Aeneas and his furious anger, refusing all compromise, makes a satisfactory peace impossible without a single combat between himself and his rival. Aeneas and Latinus solemnly ratify the treaty with religious rites, but the single combat is to hc allowed, and its decision is to govern the fate of Italy. The second act 216-697 show, s this passionate individual misleading the Italians into a repudiation 2 The Death of Turnus of the treaty just concIuded they think he is unfairly matched with Aeneas they fancy that the omens are in their favour they outrage both civil and religious laws by rushing into the battle. Fighting goes on with varying fortune Aeneas is wounded and healed by his divine mothers heIp to the other side Juno sends divine aid in Juturna. At last the battle inclines against the Latins, Aeneas attacks the city of Laurentum itself, and the Latin queen Amata hangs herself in despair. Turnus is summoned to the point of danger as the last hope of the losing side. The third act 698-end contains the single combat of Turnus and Aeneas, interrupted in the narrative only by a sudden change of scene to OIympus, where Jupiter and Juno settle the course of the future history of Italy by a compromise honourable for both Trojans and Latins. But Tvrnus must first be conquered, for he represents the spirit of disunion and strife and a terrible messenger is sent from Jupiter to effect this by paraIyzing his energies, Aeneas has him at his mercy but wouId have spared him, if his eye had not caught the ill-omened spoil he was wearing, the belt of his victim Pallas, Evanders beautiful son. . . This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., Dyer Press

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The Death Of Turnus (Paperback) - W. Warde Fowler
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W. Warde Fowler:

The Death Of Turnus (Paperback) - Livres de poche

2008, ISBN: 1443774804

ID: 2689674685

[EAN: 9781443774802], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.INTRODUCTORY NOTE AFTER the publication of Aeneas at the Site of Rome, I went on to the ninth and following books, relieving by such studies the constant anxiety of last winter and spring 1917-18. These last books of the Aeneid seemed to me to demand more knowledge of things Roman and Italian than the earlier ones and a long experience of life and thought in ancient Italy is my only real justification for attempting to illuminate any part of Virgils poems. Once more, then, I venture some observations on a single book, encouraged by much friendly correspondence and criticism. The choice of the twelfth book is explained by the fact that it is the only one of the last four which contains a complete story in itself, while at the same time it forms a magnificent conclusion to the greater story of the whole epic. I may add that it is in my judgment the poets most mature work, and reveah his mind more fully to those who study it closely than any other book but the sixth and I The Death of Turnus that its great wealth of detail and incident, its psychological subtlety, and the comparative difficulty of its language, give it a claim to closer study and more leisurely reflection than any other book in the poem. It is, indeed, so full of dctail and difficulty that it is not easy to grasp the story it tells and to keep it in thc memory. It may be of some use to the reader if, instead of a synopsis-still more bewildering than the poetry, 1 venture to suggest that the book falls conveniently into three parts or acts, of which the first and third are the shortest and most important, and thc second the longest and least interesting to a modern. In the first act down to line 215 we have the earnest endeavour of Aencas and Latinus to make a fair and lasting peace between Trojans and Latins, in accordance with the decrees of Fate. Turnus, however, claims his right to thc hand of Lavinia, and the right to dobattle for it with Aeneas and his furious anger, refusing all compromise, makes a satisfactory peace impossible without a single combat between himself and his rival. Aeneas and Latinus solemnly ratify the treaty with religious rites, but the single combat is to hc allowed, and its decision is to govern the fate of Italy. The second act 216-697 show, s this passionate individual misleading the Italians into a repudiation 2 The Death of Turnus of the treaty just concIuded they think he is unfairly matched with Aeneas they fancy that the omens are in their favour they outrage both civil and religious laws by rushing into the battle. Fighting goes on with varying fortune Aeneas is wounded and healed by his divine mothers heIp to the other side Juno sends divine aid in Juturna. At last the battle inclines against the Latins, Aeneas attacks the city of Laurentum itself, and the Latin queen Amata hangs herself in despair. Turnus is summoned to the point of danger as the last hope of the losing side. The third act 698-end contains the single combat of Turnus and Aeneas, interrupted in the narrative only by a sudden change of scene to OIympus, where Jupiter and Juno settle the course of the future history of Italy by a compromise honourable for both Trojans and Latins. But Tvrnus must first be conquered, for he represents the spirit of disunion and strife and a terrible messenger is sent from Jupiter to effect this by paraIyzing his energies, Aeneas has him at his mercy but wouId have spared him, if his eye had not caught the ill-omened spoil he was wearing, the belt of his victim Pallas, Evanders beautiful son.

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The Death Of Turnus - W. Warde Fowler
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ISBN: 9781443774802

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INTRODUCTORY NOTE AFTER the publication of Aeneas at the Site of Rome, I went on to the ninth and following books, relieving by such studies the constant anxiety of last winter and spring 1917-18. These last books of the Aeneid seemed to me to demand more knowledge of things Roman and Italian than the earlier ones and a long experience of life and thought in ancient Italy is my only real justification for attempting to illuminate any part of Virgils poems. Once more, then, I venture some observations on a single book, encouraged by much friendly correspondence and criticism. The choice of the twelfth book is explained by the fact that it is the only one of the last four which contains a complete story in itself, while at the same time it forms a magnificent conclusion to the greater story of the whole epic. I may add that it is in my judgment the poets most mature work, and reveah his mind more fully to those who study it closely than any other book but the sixth and I The Death of Turnus that its great wealth of detail and incident, its psychological subtlety, and the comparative difficulty of its language, give it a claim to closer study and more leisurely reflection than any other book in the poem. It is, indeed, so full of dctail and difficulty that it is not easy to grasp the story it tells and to keep it in thc memory. It may be of some use to the reader if, instead of a synopsis-still more bewildering than the poetry, 1 venture to suggest that the book falls conveniently into three parts or acts, of which the first and third are the shortest and most important, and thc second the longest and least interesting to a modern. In the first act down to line 215 we have the earnest endeavour of Aencas and Latinus to make a fair and lasting peace between Trojans and Latins, in accordance with the decrees of Fate. Turnus, however, claims his right to thc hand of Lavinia, and the right to dobattle for it with Aeneas and his furious anger, refusing all compromise, makes a satisfactory peace impossible without a single combat between himself and his rival. Aeneas and Latinus solemnly ratify the treaty with religious rites, but the single combat is to hc allowed, and its decision is to govern the fate of Italy. The second act 216-697 show,s this passionate individual misleading the Italians into a repudiation 2 The Death of Turnus of the treaty just concIuded they think he is unfairly matched with Aeneas they fancy that the omens are in their favour they outrage both civil and religious laws by rushing into the battle. Fighting goes on with varying fortune Aeneas is wounded and healed by his divine mothers heIp to the other side Juno sends divine aid in Juturna. At last the battle inclines against the Latins, Aeneas attacks the city of Laurentum itself, and the Latin queen Amata hangs herself in despair. Turnus is summoned to the point of danger as the last hope of the losing side. The third act 698-end contains the single combat of Turnus and Aeneas, interrupted in the narrative only by a sudden change of scene to OIympus, where Jupiter and Juno settle the course of the future history of Italy by a compromise honourable for both Trojans and Latins. But Tvrnus must first be conquered, for he represents the spirit of disunion and strife and a terrible messenger is sent from Jupiter to effect this by paraIyzing his energies, Aeneas has him at his mercy but wouId have spared him, if his eye had not caught the ill-omened spoil he was wearing, the belt of his victim Pallas, Evanders beautiful son... W. Warde Fowler, Books, History, The Death Of Turnus Books>History, Dyer Press

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[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: Dyer Press], INTRODUCTORY NOTE AFTER the publication of Aeneas at the Site of Rome, I went on to the ninth and following books, relieving by such studies the constant anxiety of last winter and spring 1917-18. These last books of the Aeneid seemed to me to demand more knowledge of things Roman and Italian than the earlier ones and a long experience of life and thought in ancient Italy is my only real justification for attempting to illuminate any part of Virgils poems. Once more, then, I venture some observations on a single book, encouraged by much friendly correspondence and criticism. The choice of the twelfth book is explained by the fact that it is the only one of the last four which contains a complete story in itself, while at the same time it forms a magnificent conclusion to the greater story of the whole epic. I may add that it is in my judgment the poets most mature work, and reveah his mind more fully to those who study it closely than any other book but the sixth and I The Death of Turnus that its great wealth of detail and incident, its psychological subtlety, and the comparative difficulty of its language, give it a claim to closer study and more leisurely reflection than any other book in the poem. It is, indeed, so full of dctail and difficulty that it is not easy to grasp the story it tells and to keep it in thc memory. It may be of some use to the reader if, instead of a synopsis-still more bewildering than the poetry, 1 venture to suggest that the book falls conveniently into three parts or acts, of which the first and third are the shortest and most important, and thc second the longest and least interesting to a modern. In the first act down to line 215 we have the earnest endeavour of Aencas and Latinus to make a fair and lasting peace between Trojans and Latins, in accordance with the decrees of Fate. Turnus, however, claims his right to thc hand of Lavinia, and the right to dobattle for it with Aeneas and his furious anger, refusing all compromise, makes a satisfactory peace impossible without a single combat between himself and his rival. Aeneas and Latinus solemnly ratify the treaty with religious rites, but the single combat is to hc allowed, and its decision is to govern the fate of Italy. The second act 216-697 show,s this passionate individual misleading the Italians into a repudiation 2 The Death of Turnus of the treaty just concIuded they think he is unfairly matched with Aeneas they fancy that the omens are in their favour they outrage both civil and religious laws by rushing into the battle. Fighting goes on with varying fortune Aeneas is wounded and healed by his divine mothers heIp to the other side Juno sends divine aid in Juturna. At last the battle inclines against the Latins, Aeneas attacks the city of Laurentum itself, and the Latin queen Amata hangs herself in despair. Turnus is summoned to the point of danger as the last hope of the losing side. The third act 698-end contains the single combat of Turnus and Aeneas, interrupted in the narrative only by a sudden change of scene to OIympus, where Jupiter and Juno settle the course of the future history of Italy by a compromise honourable for both Trojans and Latins. But Tvrnus must first be conquered, for he represents the spirit of disunion and strife and a terrible messenger is sent from Jupiter to effect this by paraIyzing his energies, Aeneas has him at his mercy but wouId have spared him, if his eye had not caught the ill-omened spoil he was wearing, the belt of his victim Pallas, Evanders beautiful son...Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

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Taschenbuch, [EAN: 9781443774802], Dyer Press, Englisch, Englisch, Englisch, Dyer Press, Book, Dyer Press, Dyer Press, 65140011, Geschichte, 65141011, Afrika, 65383011, Altertum, 65196011, Amerika, 65622011, Arktis & Antarktis, 65400011, Asien, 65450011, Australien & Ozeanien, 65458011, Europa, 65538011, Historische Forschung, 65567011, Militär, 65621011, Militärwissenschaft, 65550011, Nahost, 65449011, Russland, 65597011, Weltgeschichte, 54071011, Genres, 52044011, Fremdsprachige Bücher, 208623031, Taschenbuch, 208621031, Format (binding_browse-bin), 366250011, Refinements, 52044011, Fremdsprachige Bücher

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The Death of Turnus
Auteur:

Fowler, W. Warde

Titre:

The Death of Turnus

ISBN:

9781443774802

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Informations détaillées sur le livre - The Death of Turnus


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781443774802
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1443774804
Livre de poche
Date de parution: 2008
Editeur: Dyer Press
168 Pages
Poids: 0,218 kg
Langue: eng/Englisch

Livre dans la base de données depuis 24.08.2010 13:20:54
Livre trouvé récemment le 18.08.2016 17:02:54
ISBN/EAN: 9781443774802

ISBN - Autres types d'écriture:
1-4437-7480-4, 978-1-4437-7480-2

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